XML Unmarshalling – Convert XML to Java objects using JAXB Version 3

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The previous tutorial explain the Marshalling of Java Object to XML using JAXB Version 3.

There are tutorials about marshalling and unmarshalling XML using JAXB Version 2.

Marshalling – How to convert Java Objects to XML using JAXB

UnMarshalling- How to convert XML to Java Objects using JAXB

As of Java 11, JAXB is not part of the JRE anymore, and you need to configure the relevant libraries via your dependency management system, for example, either Maven or Gradle.

Configure the Java compiler level to be at least 11 and add the JAXB Version 3 dependencies to your pom file.

<!-- JAXB API v3.0.1 -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>jakarta.xml.bind</groupId>
    <artifactId>jakarta.xml.bind-api</artifactId>
    <version>3.0.1</version>
</dependency>

<!-- JAXB v3.0.2 reference implementation (curiously with com.sun coordinates) -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.sun.xml.bind</groupId>
    <artifactId>jaxb-impl</artifactId>
    <version>3.0.2</version>
    <scope>runtime</scope>
</dependency>

To know about the difference between JAXB Version 2 and JAXB Version3, refer this tutorial.

Sample XML Structure

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<EmployeeDetail>
    <firstName>Terry</firstName>
    <lastName>Mathew</lastName>
    <age>30</age>
    <salary>75000.0</salary>
    <designation>Manager</designation>
    <contactNumber>+919999988822</contactNumber>
    <emailId>abc@test.com</emailId>
    <gender>female</gender>
    <maritalStatus>married</maritalStatus>
</EmployeeDetail>

Now, let us create the Java Objects (POJO) of above XML.

import jakarta.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessType;
import jakarta.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessorType;
import jakarta.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;

@XmlRootElement(name = "EmployeeDetail")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class Employee {

	private String firstName;
	private String lastName;
	private int age;
	private double salary;
	private String designation;
	private String contactNumber;
	private String emailId;
	private String gender;
	private String maritalStatus;

	public Employee() {
		super();

	}

	// Getter and setter methods
	public String getFirstName() {
		return firstName;
	}

	public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
		this.firstName = firstName;
	}

	public String getLastName() {
		return lastName;
	}

	public void setLastName(String lastName) {
		this.lastName = lastName;
	}

	public int getAge() {
		return age;
	}

	public void setAge(int age) {
		this.age = age;
	}

	public double getSalary() {
		return salary;
	}

	public void setSalary(double salary) {
		this.salary = salary;
	}

	public String getDesignation() {
		return designation;
	}

	public void setDesignation(String designation) {
		this.designation = designation;
	}

	public String getContactNumber() {
		return contactNumber;
	}

	public void setContactNumber(String contactNumber) {
		this.contactNumber = contactNumber;
	}

	public String getEmailId() {
		return emailId;
	}

	public void setEmailId(String emailId) {
		this.emailId = emailId;
	}

	public String getGender() {
		return gender;
	}

	public void setGender(String gender) {
		this.gender = gender;
	}

	public String getMaritalStatus() {
		return maritalStatus;
	}

	public void setMaritalStatus(String maritalStatus) {
		this.maritalStatus = maritalStatus;
	}

    @Override
	public String toString() {
		return "Employee [FirstName=" + firstName + ", LastName=" + lastName + ", Age=" + age + ", Salary=" + salary
				+ ", Designation=" + designation + ", ContactNumber=" + contactNumber + ", EmailId=" + emailId
				+ ", Gender=" + gender + ", MaritalStatus=" + maritalStatus + "]";
	}
}

Let’s create a simple program using the JAXBContext which provides an abstraction for managing the XML/Java binding information necessary to implement the JAXB binding framework operations and unmarshal.

import java.io.File;

import org.junit.Test;

import jakarta.xml.bind.JAXBContext;
import jakarta.xml.bind.JAXBException;
import jakarta.xml.bind.Unmarshaller;

public class JAXBDeserialization {

	@Test
	public void JAXBUnmarshalTest() {

		try {

			String userDir = System.getProperty("user.dir");
			File file = new File(userDir + "\\src\\test\\resources\\JAXB_XML.xml");

			JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(Employee.class);

			Unmarshaller jaxbUnmarshaller = jaxbContext.createUnmarshaller();
			Employee employee = (Employee) jaxbUnmarshaller.unmarshal(file);
			System.out.println(employee);

		} catch (JAXBException e) {
			e.printStackTrace();
		}

	}

When we run the code above, we may check the console output to verify that we have successfully converted XML data into a Java object:

This response is the result of the toString() method in POJO Class.

There is another way to get the values of each node of XML.

   @Test
	public void JAXBUnmarshalTest1() {

		try {

			String userDir = System.getProperty("user.dir");
			File file = new File(userDir + "\\src\\test\\resources\\JAXB_XML.xml");

			JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(Employee.class);

			Unmarshaller jaxbUnmarshaller = jaxbContext.createUnmarshaller();
			Employee employee = (Employee) jaxbUnmarshaller.unmarshal(file);

			System.out.println("FirstName: " + employee.getFirstName());
			System.out.println("LastName: " + employee.getLastName());
			System.out.println("Age: " + employee.getAge());
			System.out.println("Salary: " + employee.getSalary());
			System.out.println("Contact Number: " + employee.getContactNumber());
			System.out.println("Designation: " + employee.getDesignation());
			System.out.println("Gender: " + employee.getGender());
			System.out.println("EmailId: " + employee.getEmailId());
			System.out.println("MaritalStatus: " + employee.getMaritalStatus());

		} catch (JAXBException e) {
			e.printStackTrace();
		}

	}

When we run the code above, we may check the console output to verify that we have successfully converted XML data into a Java object:

The Unmarshaller class governs the process of deserializing XML data into newly created Java content trees, optionally validating the XML data as it is unmarshalled. It provides overloading of unmarshal methods for many input kinds.

We are done! Congratulations on making it through this tutorial and hope you found it useful! Happy Learning!!

@XmlElementWrapper Annotation for XML – JAXB

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The previous tutorials explain how to use JAXB(Java Architecture for XML Binding) to parse XML documents to Java objects and vice versa. This is also called Marshalling and Unmarshalling.

This tutorial explains @XmlElementWrapper Annotation.

Configure the Java compiler level to be at least 11 and add the JAXB dependencies to the pom file.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
  xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 https://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
  <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

  <groupId>org.example</groupId>
  <artifactId>JAXBDemo</artifactId>
  <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>

  <name>JAXBDemo</name>
  <url>http://www.example.com</url>

  <properties>  

    <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
    <maven.compiler.source>11</maven.compiler.source>
    <maven.compiler.target>11</maven.compiler.target>
  </properties>

  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>junit</groupId>
      <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
      <version>4.13.2</version>
      <scope>test</scope>
  </dependency>
    
 <dependency>
    <groupId>com.sun.xml.bind</groupId>
    <artifactId>jaxb-impl</artifactId>
    <version>2.3.3</version>
   </dependency>
 </dependencies>
   
</project>

@XmlElementWrapper generates a wrapper element around XML representation. This is primarily intended to be used to produce a wrapper XML element around collections.

This annotation can be used with the following annotations –  XmlElementXmlElementsXmlElementRefXmlElementRefsXmlJavaTypeAdapter.

@XmlElementWrapper and @XmlElement (Wrapped collection)

Let us understand this with the help of an example shown below.

@XmlRootElement(name = "CustomerDetails")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class Customer {

	private int id;

	private String name;
	private int yearOfBirth;
	private String emailId;
	private String streetAddress;

	private String postcode;

	@XmlElementWrapper(name = "emergencyContacts")
	@XmlElement(name = "Contact")
	private List<String> emergencyContacts;

	public Customer() {
		super();
	}

	public Customer(int id, String name, int yearOfBirth, String emailId, String streetAddress, String postcode,
			List<String> emergencyContacts) {
		super();
		this.id = id;
		this.name = name;
		this.yearOfBirth = yearOfBirth;
		this.emailId = emailId;
		this.streetAddress = streetAddress;
		this.postcode = postcode;
		this.emergencyContacts = emergencyContacts;
	}

	public int getId() {
		return id;
	}

	public void setId(int id) {
		this.id = id;
	}

	public String getName() {
		return name;
	}

	public void setName(String name) {
		this.name = name;
	}

	public int getYearOfBirth() {
		return yearOfBirth;
	}

	public void setYearOfBirth(int yearOfBirth) {
		this.yearOfBirth = yearOfBirth;
	}

	public String getEmailId() {
		return emailId;
	}

	public void setEmailId(String emailId) {
		this.emailId = emailId;
	}

	public String getStreetAddress() {
		return streetAddress;
	}

	public void setStreetAddress(String streetAddress) {
		this.streetAddress = streetAddress;
	}

	public String getPostcode() {
		return postcode;
	}

	public void setPostcode(String postcode) {
		this.postcode = postcode;
	}

	public List<String> getEmergencyContacts() {
		return emergencyContacts;
	}

	public void setEmergencyContacts(List<String> emergencyContacts) {
		this.emergencyContacts = emergencyContacts;
	}
}

Now, let us create a Test to convert these Java Objects to XML.

   @Test
	public void Test() {

		try {

			Customer cust = new Customer();
			cust.setId(1111);
			cust.setName("Tim");
			cust.setYearOfBirth(1988);
			cust.setEmailId("Test@test.com");
			cust.setStreetAddress("6, JaySmith, Dublin");
			cust.setPostcode("A12 YP22");

			cust.setEmergencyContacts(Arrays.asList("98675 12312", "88881 23415", "44123 67453"));

			// Create JAXB Context
			JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(Customer.class);

			// Create Marshaller
			Marshaller jaxbMarshaller = context.createMarshaller();

			// Required formatting
			jaxbMarshaller.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, Boolean.TRUE);

			// Write XML to StringWriter
			StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
			jaxbMarshaller.marshal(cust, sw);

			// Print XML Content
			String xmlContent = sw.toString();
			System.out.println(xmlContent);

		} catch (PropertyException e) {
			e.printStackTrace();

		} catch (JAXBException e) {

		}
	}

Here, contact is within emergencyContacts, because contact is @XmlElement.

Use Only @XmlElementWrapper

@XmlRootElement(name = "CustomerDetails")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)

public class Customer {

	private int id;

	private String name;
	private int yearOfBirth;
	private String emailId;
	private String streetAddress;

	private String postcode;

	@XmlElementWrapper(name = "emergencyContacts")
 //	@XmlElement(name = "Contact") //Commented this
	private List<String> emergencyContacts;

	public Customer() {
		super();
	}

	public Customer(int id, String name, int yearOfBirth, String emailId, String streetAddress, String postcode,
			List<String> emergencyContacts) {
		super();
		this.id = id;
		this.name = name;
		this.yearOfBirth = yearOfBirth;
		this.emailId = emailId;
		this.streetAddress = streetAddress;
		this.postcode = postcode;
		this.emergencyContacts = emergencyContacts;
	}

Here, there is no contact within emergencyContacts, it is because there is no @XmlElement for contact.

Do not use @XmlElementWrapper (Unwrapped collection)

@XmlRootElement(name = "CustomerDetails")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)

public class Customer {

	private int id;

	private String name;
	private int yearOfBirth;
	private String emailId;
	private String streetAddress;

	private String postcode;

 //@XmlElementWrapper(name = "emergencyContacts") Commented this
	@XmlElement(name = "Contact")
	private List<String> emergencyContacts;

	public Customer() {
		super();
	}

	public Customer(int id, String name, int yearOfBirth, String emailId, String streetAddress, String postcode,
			List<String> emergencyContacts) {
		super();
		this.id = id;
		this.name = name;
		this.yearOfBirth = yearOfBirth;
		this.emailId = emailId;
		this.streetAddress = streetAddress;
		this.postcode = postcode;
		this.emergencyContacts = emergencyContacts;
	}

Here, there is no @XmlElementWrapper. So, all the contact appear as attributes of XML.

I hope this has helped to understand the usage of @XmlElementWrapper.

We are done! Congratulations on making it through this tutorial and hope you found it useful! Happy Learning!!

UnMarshalling- How to convert XML to Java Objects using JAXB

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This tutorial explains how to use JAXB (Java Architecture for XML Binding) to convert an XML document to Java Objects.

The previous tutorial has explained the conversion of Java Objects to XML.

As of Java 11, JAXB is not part of the JRE anymore, and you need to configure the relevant libraries via your dependency management system, for example, either Maven or Gradle.

Configure the Java compiler level to be at least 11 and add the JAXB dependencies to your pom file.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
 
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
  xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 https://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
  <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
 
  <groupId>org.example</groupId>
  <artifactId>JAXBDemo</artifactId>
  <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
 
  <name>JAXBDemo</name>
  <url>http://www.example.com</url>
 
  <properties>  
 
    <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
    <maven.compiler.source>11</maven.compiler.source>
    <maven.compiler.target>11</maven.compiler.target>
  </properties>
 
  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>junit</groupId>
      <artifactId>junit</artifactId>
      <version>4.13.2</version>
      <scope>test</scope>
  </dependency>
     
 <dependency>
    <groupId>com.sun.xml.bind</groupId>
    <artifactId>jaxb-impl</artifactId>
    <version>2.3.3</version>
   </dependency>
 </dependencies>
    
</project>

Sample XML Structure

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<EmployeeDetails>
    <firstName>Terry</firstName>
    <lastName>Mathew</lastName>
    <gender>female</gender>
    <age>30</age>
    <maritalStatus>married</maritalStatus>
    <designation>Manager</designation>
    <contactNumber>+919999988822</contactNumber>
    <emailId>abc@test.com</emailId>
    <GrossSalary>75000.0</GrossSalary>
</EmployeeDetails>

Un-marshalling provides a client application the ability to convert XML data into JAXB derived Java objects.

Let’s see the steps to convert XML document into java object.

  1. Create POJO Class
  2. Create the JAXBContext object
  3. Create the Unmarshaller objects
  4. Call the unmarshal method
  5. Use getter methods of POJO to access the data

Now, let us create the Java Objects (POJO) for the above XML.

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessType;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlAccessorType;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlType;

@XmlRootElement(name = "EmployeeDetails")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)

//Define the order in which the fields are written in XML
@XmlType(propOrder = { "firstName", "lastName", "gender", "age", "maritalStatus", "designation", "contactNumber","emailId", "salary" })

public class Employee {

	private String firstName;
	private String lastName;
	private int age;

	@XmlElement(name = "GrossSalary")
	private double salary;
	private String designation;
	private String contactNumber;
	private String emailId;
	private String gender;
	private String maritalStatus;

	public Employee() {
		super();

	}

	// Getter and setter methods
	public String getFirstName() {
		return firstName;
	}

	public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
		this.firstName = firstName;
	}

	public String getLastName() {
		return lastName;
	}

	public void setLastName(String lastName) {
		this.lastName = lastName;
	}

	public int getAge() {
		return age;
	}

	public void setAge(int age) {
		this.age = age;
	}

	public double getSalary() {
		return salary;
	}

	public void setSalary(double salary) {
		this.salary = salary;
	}

	public String getDesignation() {
		return designation;
	}

	public void setDesignation(String designation) {
		this.designation = designation;
	}

	public String getContactNumber() {
		return contactNumber;
	}

	public void setContactNumber(String contactNumber) {
		this.contactNumber = contactNumber;
	}

	public String getEmailId() {
		return emailId;
	}

	public void setEmailId(String emailId) {
		this.emailId = emailId;
	}

	public String getGender() {
		return gender;
	}

	public void setGender(String gender) {
		this.gender = gender;
	}

	public String getMaritalStatus() {
		return maritalStatus;
	}

	public void setMaritalStatus(String maritalStatus) {
		this.maritalStatus = maritalStatus;
	}

	@Override
	public String toString() {
		return "Employee [FirstName=" + firstName + ", LastName=" + lastName + ", Age=" + age + ", Salary=" + salary
				+ ", Designation=" + designation + ", ContactNumber=" + contactNumber + ", EmailId=" + emailId
				+ ", Gender=" + gender + ", MaritalStatus=" + maritalStatus + "]";
	}
}

Create the following test program for reading the XML file. The XML file is present under src/test/resources.

Let’s use JAXB Unmarshaller to unmarshal our JAXB_XML back to a Java object:

import java.io.File;
import javax.xml.bind.JAXBContext;
import javax.xml.bind.JAXBException;
import javax.xml.bind.Unmarshaller;
import org.junit.Test;

public class JAXBDeserialization {
	
	@Test
	public void JAXBUnmarshalTest() {

		try {

			String userDir = System.getProperty("user.dir");
			File file = new File(userDir + "\\src\\test\\resources\\JAXB_XML.xml");
			JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(Employee.class);

			Unmarshaller jaxbUnmarshaller = jaxbContext.createUnmarshaller();
			Employee employee = (Employee) jaxbUnmarshaller.unmarshal(file);

			System.out.println("FirstName: " + employee.getFirstName());
			System.out.println("LastName: " + employee.getLastName());
			System.out.println("Age: " + employee.getAge());
			System.out.println("Salary: " + employee.getSalary());
			System.out.println("Contact Number: " + employee.getContactNumber());
			System.out.println("Designation: " + employee.getDesignation());
			System.out.println("Gender: " + employee.getGender());
			System.out.println("EmailId: " + employee.getEmailId());
			System.out.println("MaritalStatus: " + employee.getMaritalStatus());

		} catch (JAXBException e) {
			e.printStackTrace();
		}

	}

	}

When we run the code above, we may check the console output to verify that we have successfully converted XML data into a Java object:

There is another simple way of unmarshalling the XML to Java Objects.

    @Test
	public void JAXBUnmarshalTest1() {

		try {

			String userDir = System.getProperty("user.dir");
			File file = new File(userDir + "\\src\\test\\resources\\JAXB_XML.xml");

			JAXBContext jaxbContext = JAXBContext.newInstance(Employee.class);
			Unmarshaller jaxbUnmarshaller = jaxbContext.createUnmarshaller();
			Employee emp = (Employee) jaxbUnmarshaller.unmarshal(file);

			System.out.println(emp);

		} catch (JAXBException e) {
			e.printStackTrace();
		}
	}

When we run the code above, we may check the console output to verify that we have successfully converted XML data into a Java object:

We are done! Congratulations on making it through this tutorial and hope you found it useful! Happy Learning!!

Rest Assured Tutorials

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RestAssured is a Java-based library that is used to test RESTful Web Services. REST-assured was designed to simplify the testing and validation of REST APIs and is highly influenced by testing techniques used in dynamic languages such as Ruby and Groovy.

Chapter 1 Introduction to Rest Assured
Chapter 2 Setup Basic REST Assured Maven Project In Eclipse IDE
Chapter 3 How to test GET Request using Rest Assured
Chapter 4 How to test POST Request using Rest Assured
Chapter 5 How to test PUT Request using Rest Assured
Chapter 6 How to test DELETE Request using Rest Assured
Chapter 7 How to test POST request from JSON Object in Rest Assured
Chapter 8 How to test POST JSON Object request using Java Map in Rest Assured
Chapter 9 How to create JSON Array Request Body
Chapter 10 Assertion of JSON in Rest Assured using Hamcrest
Chapter 11 Extraction from JSON in Rest Assured
Chapter 12 How To Send A JSON/XML File As Payload To Request using Rest Assured
Chapter 13 Logging in Rest Assured

JSON Manipulation

Gradle

Chapter 1 Setup Basic REST Assured Gradle Project In Eclipse IDE

Frameworks

Chapter 1 Integration of REST Assured with TestNG
Chapter 2 Serenity BDD with Cucumber and Rest Assured
Chapter 3 Serenity BDD with Cucumber and Rest Assured in Gradle
Chapter 4 How To Create Gradle Project with Cucumber to test Rest API
Chapter 5 Rest API Test in Cucumber BDD